nativeamericannews
nativeamericannews:

LAX Rookies Miles and Ty Thompson Pump Up Excitement for NLL Season
Miles and Ty Thompson were drafted to the National Lacrosse League on September 22, but that excitement may be no match for the day that they step out on to the field for the first time as pros.“The thing I look forward to most about the NLL is being able to play the game of lacrosse as a professional athlete, especially as it has been my goal since I was a kid,” Miles Thompson told NLL News.

nativeamericannews:

LAX Rookies Miles and Ty Thompson Pump Up Excitement for NLL Season

Miles and Ty Thompson were drafted to the National Lacrosse League on September 22, but that excitement may be no match for the day that they step out on to the field for the first time as pros.“The thing I look forward to most about the NLL is being able to play the game of lacrosse as a professional athlete, especially as it has been my goal since I was a kid,” Miles Thompson told NLL News.

throughthefeathers
atimo-taguy:

Mass Execution of aboriginal Children from the Mohawk Residential School located in Ontario. They took all those children and stood them up next to a big ditch, then they shot them all and they all fell into the ditch. Some of the kids were still alive and they just poured the dirt in on top of them. Buried them alive. Prisoners of the church. This mass murder happened in 1943 – in Brantford, Ontario, on land occupied by the Canadian Army, at its Basic Training Camp Number 20 Lorna McNaughton of Ohsweken, Ontario: is a survivor of the infamous “Mush Hole”, the Brantford Mohawk Indian residential school, run by the Church and Crown of England until 1970. Why were these children shot?  The school was overcrowded just then. She was there, Lorna saw the army bring in all these cots for lots of new kids who showed up from all over the country. They must have just wanted to get rid of all the extra hungry mouths; it was wartime and everything was rationed. One day those new kids were in the dorms, then they were all taken out, and were never seen again. A probable site of this mass burial of the executed children has been located, and is now under the protection and jurisdiction of the Onkwehonwe Mohawk Nation and its clan mothers. #indigenous #aboriginal The investigation into the Canadian Genocide continues.  The Mohawk residential school Institute, 1832-1970 – Church of England (Anglican) operated - Ontario.

atimo-taguy:

Mass Execution of aboriginal Children from the Mohawk Residential School located in Ontario. They took all those children and stood them up next to a big ditch, then they shot them all and they all fell into the ditch. Some of the kids were still alive and they just poured the dirt in on top of them. Buried them alive.

Prisoners of the church. This mass murder happened in 1943 – in Brantford, Ontario, on land occupied by the Canadian Army, at its Basic Training Camp Number 20

Lorna McNaughton of Ohsweken, Ontario: is a survivor of the infamous “Mush Hole”, the Brantford Mohawk Indian residential school, run by the Church and Crown of England until 1970.

Why were these children shot?

The school was overcrowded just then. She was there, Lorna saw the army bring in all these cots for lots of new kids who showed up from all over the country. They must have just wanted to get rid of all the extra hungry mouths; it was wartime and everything was rationed. One day those new kids were in the dorms, then they were all taken out, and were never seen again.

A probable site of this mass burial of the executed children has been located, and is now under the protection and jurisdiction of the Onkwehonwe Mohawk Nation and its clan mothers. #indigenous #aboriginal

The investigation into the Canadian Genocide continues.

The Mohawk residential school Institute, 1832-1970 – Church of England (Anglican) operated - Ontario.

peopleofthelonghouse

sikssaapo-p:

for my new followers, a repost:

"On a July day in 1990, a confrontation propelled Native issues in Kanehsatake and the village of Oka, Quebec, into the international spotlight. Director Alanis Obomsawin spent 78 nerve-wracking days and nights filming the armed stand-off between the Mohawks, the Quebec police and the Canadian army. This powerful documentary takes you right into the action of an age-old Aboriginal struggle. The result is a portrait of the people behind the barricades.

Directed by Alanis Obomsawin - 1993”

nativeamericannews
nativeamericannews:

Pura Fé ~ Tuscarora-Deer Clan
Pura Fé (born: Pura Fé Antonia (“Toni”) Crescioni) is a songwriter, musician, and singer, and the founding member of a Native American women’s a capella trio Ulali.Personal life Pura Fé was born in New York City and brought up by her mother, grandparents and family of women singers who are Tuscarora-Deer Clan, Blackwell family line. They count eight generations of singing sisters from North Carolina. The family moved to New York in the 1930s.

nativeamericannews:

Pura Fé ~ Tuscarora-Deer Clan

Pura Fé (born: Pura Fé Antonia (“Toni”) Crescioni) is a songwriter, musician, and singer, and the founding member of a Native American women’s a capella trio Ulali.
Personal life Pura Fé was born in New York City and brought up by her mother, grandparents and family of women singers who are Tuscarora-Deer Clan, Blackwell family line. They count eight generations of singing sisters from North Carolina. The family moved to New York in the 1930s.

If you’re in the Chicago area, you don’t want to miss out on this unique collaboration!

The Mitchell Museum is pleased to announce its latest exhibit opening, “All My Relations: A Seneca History” in collaboration with visual artist and dancer Rosy Simas (Seneca). The exhibit will introduce the history of the Seneca culture through milestones in the lives of Ms. Simas and her relations. It will display traditional and modern Seneca artifacts, which over the span of generations, represent the intimate themes of loss, connection and resilience by Ms. Simas and her tribal connection.



Read more: http://www.powwows.com/2014/09/22/all-my-relations-a-seneca-history/#ixzz3EC10CYLq